The common Sega, Nintendo and PlayStation games that are worth a lot of money | Games | Entertainment

The weekly garage sale is a great place to find a bargain, whether it’s second-hand furniture, cheap electronics or second-hand power tools. It also goes without saying, but there’s usually someone who gets rid of their old DVDs and video games. Most old video games aren’t worth much, but with an increasing number of people looking for complete retro collections, you’d be surprised how many are selling for more now than when they were first released. If you’re hitting a car trunk this weekend, it’s worth taking a look at some of the following Sega, Nintendo, and PlayStation games.

First, let’s look at some PS2 games that you might realistically find when visiting a car trunk.

The action game God Hand has become cult among beat-em-up fans, so much so that the prices have started to climb.

According to the Price Charting website, used copies of God Hand in its original box and with an instruction manual sell for between £48 and £93.

Another game you might realistically come across is Manhunt 2, which commands upwards of £86 if in good condition and with instructions.

Elsewhere, Silent Hill Collection (which I used to own but ended up selling for well under that amount) can fetch prices from £107.

PSOne games worth checking out include Klonoa Door to Phantomile, Suikoden, Suikoden 2, Clock Tower, and Castlevania Symphony of the Night.

The only downside to PSOne games is that they tend to be in poor condition, which drives down the selling price.

The same goes for older Super Nintendo, NES, and N64 games, which were packaged in unsustainable cardboard boxes.

Even so, Nintendo cartridges are still worth a pretty penny, provided they’re rare enough. Prices for the following games are based on free copies of the games, so assume the boxed versions are worth significantly more.

On the NES, car trunk hunters should be on the lookout for Castlevania 3: Dracula’s Curse (£74), Mega Man (£60), Lethal Weapon (£117) and Mighty Final Fight (£186).

On the Super Nintendo side, Aero the Acro-Bat 2 retails for £117, Spawn retails for £106, Adventures of Batman & Robin retails for £87 and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 4: Turtles in Time commands a price of £74.

If you spot N64 games, titles like Starcraft 64, Rush 2049, Paper Mario and Conker’s Bad Fur Day all sell for over £100.

The same goes for older Super Nintendo, NES, and N64 games, which were packaged in unsustainable cardboard boxes.

Even so, Nintendo cartridges are still worth a pretty penny, provided they’re rare enough. Prices for the following games are based on free copies of the games, so assume the boxed versions are worth significantly more.

On the NES, car trunk hunters should be on the lookout for Castlevania 3: Dracula’s Curse (£74), Mega Man (£60), Lethal Weapon (£117) and Mighty Final Fight (£186).

On the Super Nintendo side, Aero the Acro-Bat 2 retails for £117, Spawn retails for £106, Adventures of Batman & Robin retails for £87 and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 4: Turtles in Time commands a price of £74.

If you spot N64 games, titles like Starcraft 64, Rush 2049, Paper Mario and Conker’s Bad Fur Day all sell for over £100.

The Sega Mega Drive was an extremely popular console in the 1990s, so the chances of spotting some Sega classics are high.

Unlike Nintendo games, Sega Mega Drive releases come in sturdy boxes with instruction manuals, so the following prices are based on finding copies with boxes and manuals.

Ecco Jr, for example, is worth £490 if you find a copy in its original box and with a manual.

Similarly, a full copy of The Punisher has been known to fetch £468. Even a loose version can sell for over £200.

Elsewhere, Probotector sells for £198, Phantasy Star IV costs £180, while popular action game Gunstar Heroes can sell for upwards of £144.

Obviously, this goes without saying, but these prices should only be used as a guide and you will not necessarily get the full amount shown.

Sites like eBay rely on visibility and charge a fee for each sale, while CEX will buy the games for less, but sell them closer to the prices listed above.

It may be helpful to bookmark the Price Charting website before your visit to the car boot.

Finally, you can pretty much ignore older copies of FIFA and Pro Evolution Soccer (especially from the PS2 era) because they really aren’t worth much.

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